Research Groups

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Research Groups

<div style="text-align: justify;">The group ‘Mechanism-based Alloy Design’ works on the microstructure-oriented design of advanced high strength steels, high entropy alloys as well as on engineering Al-, Ni- and Ti-alloys [1-10]. </div>

Mechanism-based Alloy Design

The group ‘Mechanism-based Alloy Design’ works on the microstructure-oriented design of advanced high strength steels, high entropy alloys as well as on engineering Al-, Ni- and Ti-alloys [1-10].
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Our group focuses on applying atom probe tomography (APT) to a range of advanced materials with an emphasis on correlating APT with other experimental and computational techniques.

Atom Probe Tomography

Our group focuses on applying atom probe tomography (APT) to a range of advanced materials with an emphasis on correlating APT with other experimental and computational techniques. [more]
<p style="text-align: justify;">The group is concerned with the design of advanced structural materials along with the respective synthesis and processing routes and techniques. The focus lies on steels with superior physical and mechanical properties.</p>

Combinatorial Metallurgy and Processing

The group is concerned with the design of advanced structural materials along with the respective synthesis and processing routes and techniques. The focus lies on steels with superior physical and mechanical properties.

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The M&amp;D research group is defined through two correlated tasks: on the one hand, we aim at understanding microstructure formation mechanisms and the relation between microstructures and properties of materials by investigations on the microscopic level. To this aim we develop or advance, on the other hand, microscopy and diffraction techniques. Currently the focus lies on techniques in the scanning electron microscope, in particular on the electron diffraction techniques (EBSD, 3D EBSD, XR-EBSD, ECCI).

Microscopy and Diffraction

The M&D research group is defined through two correlated tasks: on the one hand, we aim at understanding microstructure formation mechanisms and the relation between microstructures and properties of materials by investigations on the microscopic level. To this aim we develop or advance, on the other hand, microscopy and diffraction techniques. Currently the focus lies on techniques in the scanning electron microscope, in particular on the electron diffraction techniques (EBSD, 3D EBSD, XR-EBSD, ECCI). [more]
<div style="text-align: justify;">The group 'Therory and Simulation' develops constitutive models for advanced materials such as high strength steels. As the mechanical properties are of main interest crystal plasticity modelling [1] builds the core of the activities. For this purpose a number of constitutive models have been developed in the last 10 years. These models cover the full range from phenomenological descriptions to physics based formulations of dislocation slip and other deformation mechanisms such as twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) and displacive transformations (TRIP). To facilitate the implementation of the models the Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit (DAMASK, [2]) has been developed.</div>

Theory and Simulation

The group 'Therory and Simulation' develops constitutive models for advanced materials such as high strength steels. As the mechanical properties are of main interest crystal plasticity modelling [1] builds the core of the activities. For this purpose a number of constitutive models have been developed in the last 10 years. These models cover the full range from phenomenological descriptions to physics based formulations of dislocation slip and other deformation mechanisms such as twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) and displacive transformations (TRIP). To facilitate the implementation of the models the Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit (DAMASK, [2]) has been developed.
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<div style="text-align: justify;">Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a rapidly maturing technology capable of producing highly complex parts directly from a computer file and raw material powders. Its disruptive potential lies in its ability to manufacture customised products with individualisation, complexity and weight reduction for free. The purpose of this group is to understand the impact of this manufacturing process on the micro- and nanostructures of the employed alloys as well as to develop metallic materials suitable for and exploiting the unique characteristics of AM.</div>

Alloys for Additive Manufacturing

Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a rapidly maturing technology capable of producing highly complex parts directly from a computer file and raw material powders. Its disruptive potential lies in its ability to manufacture customised products with individualisation, complexity and weight reduction for free. The purpose of this group is to understand the impact of this manufacturing process on the micro- and nanostructures of the employed alloys as well as to develop metallic materials suitable for and exploiting the unique characteristics of AM.
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This group is concerned with the 3D mapping of hydrogen at near-atomic scale in metallic alloys with the aim to better understand hydrogen storage materials and hydrogen embrittlement.

Hydrogen in Energy Materials

This group is concerned with the 3D mapping of hydrogen at near-atomic scale in metallic alloys with the aim to better understand hydrogen storage materials and hydrogen embrittlement. [more]
The goal of our group is to develop novel high-entropy alloys (HEAs) with exceptional mechanical, physical and chemical properties based on the understanding of their structure-properties relations.

High Entropy Alloys

The goal of our group is to develop novel high-entropy alloys (HEAs) with exceptional mechanical, physical and chemical properties based on the understanding of their structure-properties relations. [more]
<div style="text-align: justify;">From bearings, over rails, to tooth or hip implants – the number of examples where materials are exposed to mechanical contact loads is as countless as the number of materials used under such conditions. The materials science of mechanical contacts is versatile and challenging. The loads decay with distance from the surface and with that the amount of plastic deformation. They can generate short but significant local increments in temperature.</div>

Materials Science of Mechanical Contacts

From bearings, over rails, to tooth or hip implants – the number of examples where materials are exposed to mechanical contact loads is as countless as the number of materials used under such conditions. The materials science of mechanical contacts is versatile and challenging. The loads decay with distance from the surface and with that the amount of plastic deformation. They can generate short but significant local increments in temperature.
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Find out more about our collaborative research groups.

Collaborative Research Groups

Find out more about our collaborative research groups. [more]
 
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