Research Groups

Research Groups

The aim of this group is to increase the direct sustainability of structural metals in areas such as reduced carbon dioxide-intensive primary production, low-energy metallurgical synthesis, recycling, scrap-compatible alloy design, pollutant tolerance of alloys and improved longevity of alloys. The focus lies on  the study  of the basic physical and chemical foundations for improving the direct sustainability of structural metals. [more]
Our group is trying to push functional bulk magnets to their physical limits given by their intrinsic properties. Key is the understanding of the critical magnetization reversal processes on the atomic scale. We tackle this with the most advanced correlated electron microscopies and tomographies combined with sophisticated simulation across the length scales applied to modelsystems made by additive manufacturing. [more]
Our group aims to decipher the fundamental physics governing the partitioning and diffusion of solutes at crystal defects during plastic deformation under creep and fatigue conditions in aerospace materials, such as Ni-based superalloys or Ti-alloys, so as to guide the design of new alloys with enhanced properties. [more]
This group focuses on applying and developing computational methods to solve various challenges related to materials and processes with important environmental impact, focusing on problems where the interplay of chemistry, phase transformation, microstructure, mechanics and damage plays an important role. Advances in the understanding of chemical reactions, chemo-mechanical interaction, mechanical behavior, defect evolution and material degradation, from atomistic scales up to continuum level, are required to resolve many of the most pressing challenges and achieve the goal of material sustainability. [more]
Engineering materials are subjected to various thermo-chemo-mechanical loads during production and in service. The aim of the "Integrated Computational Materials Engineering" research group is the development, implementation, and application of models that allow to investigate who the materials respond to these loads. To enable investigations at time and length scales relevant for engineering applications, the models are typically based on continuum approximations. [more]
The group ‘Mechanism-based Alloy Design’ works on the microstructure-oriented design of advanced high strength steels, high entropy alloys as well as on engineering Al-, Ni- and Ti-alloys [1-10]. [more]
Our group focuses on applying atom probe tomography (APT) to a range of advanced materials with an emphasis on correlating APT with other experimental and computational techniques. [more]
The group is concerned with the design of advanced structural materials along with the respective synthesis and processing routes and techniques. The focus lies on steels with superior physical and mechanical properties. [more]
The M&D research group is defined through two correlated tasks: on the one hand, we aim at understanding microstructure formation mechanisms and the relation between microstructures and properties of materials by investigations on the microscopic level. To this aim we develop or advance, on the other hand, microscopy and diffraction techniques. Currently the focus lies on techniques in the scanning electron microscope, in particular on the electron diffraction techniques (EBSD, 3D EBSD, XR-EBSD, ECCI). [more]
The group 'Therory and Simulation' develops constitutive models for advanced materials such as high strength steels. As the mechanical properties are of main interest crystal plasticity modelling [1] builds the core of the activities. For this purpose a number of constitutive models have been developed in the last 15 years. These models cover the full range from phenomenological descriptions to physics based formulations of dislocation slip and other deformation mechanisms such as twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) and displacive transformations (TRIP). To facilitate the implementation of the models the Düsseldorf Advanced MAterial Simulation Kit (DAMASK, [2]) has been developed. [more]
Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a rapidly maturing technology capable of producing highly complex parts directly from a computer file and raw material powders. Its disruptive potential lies in its ability to manufacture customised products with individualisation, complexity and weight reduction for free. The purpose of this group is to understand the impact of this manufacturing process on the micro- and nanostructures of the employed alloys as well as to develop metallic materials suitable for and exploiting the unique characteristics of AM. [more]
This group is concerned with the 3D mapping of hydrogen at near-atomic scale in metallic alloys with the aim to better understand hydrogen storage materials and hydrogen embrittlement. [more]
The goal of our group is to develop novel high-entropy alloys (HEAs) with exceptional mechanical, physical and chemical properties based on the understanding of their structure-properties relations. [more]
From bearings, over rails, to tooth or hip implants – the number of examples where materials are exposed to mechanical contact loads is as countless as the number of materials used under such conditions. The materials science of mechanical contacts is versatile and challenging. The loads decay with distance from the surface and with that the amount of plastic deformation. They can generate short but significant local increments in temperature. [more]
Find out more about our collaborative research groups. [more]
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