Group Leader

Dr. Tilmann Hickel
Tilmann Hickel
Phone: +49 211 6792 397
+49 211 6792 575
Fax: +49 211 6792 465

Key Publications

1.
Tilmann Hickel, Blazej Grabowski, Fritz Körmann, and Jörg Neugebauer, "Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: Methods and applications in steel design," Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 24, 053202 (2012).
2.
Fritz Körmann, Blazej Grabowski, Biswanath Dutta, Tilmann Hickel, L. Mauger, Brent T. Fultz, and Jörg Neugebauer, "Temperature dependent magnon-phonon coupling in bcc Fe from theory and experiment," Physical Review Letters 113 (16), 165503 (2014).
3.
Matthé Uijttewaal, Tilmann Hickel, Jörg Neugebauer, Markus E. Gruner, and Peter Entel, "Understanding the phase transformations of the Ni2MnGa shape memory system from first principles," Physical Review Letters 102 (3), 035702 (2009).
4.
Albert Glensk, Blazej Grabowski, Tilmann Hickel, and Jörg Neugebauer, "Breakdown of the Arrhenius law in describing vacancy formation energies: The importance of local anharmonicity revealed by Ab initio thermodynamics," Physical Review X 4 (1), 011018 (2014).

Computational Phase Studies

Computational Phase Studies

The research in this group is devoted to the physics of (meta)stable thermodynamic phases as well as transitions between them. The major vision is an ab initio based prediction of thermodynamic bulk phase diagrams, being directly related to many technologically relevant properties and processes in metals.

The research in the group is focused on the development and application of state-­of-­the-­art ab initio techniques employing density functional theory (DFT) in the following fields:

Ab initio derived (red lines) heat capacities (in kB) of Fe and Al based on accurate methods to determine all relevant contributions to the free energy. Zoom Image
Ab initio derived (red lines) heat capacities (in kB) of Fe and Al based on accurate methods to determine all relevant contributions to the free energy. [less]
  • The continuous improvement of ab initio based methods to calculate the critical contributions to the free energy of metals, their application to industrially relevant materials, and the combination of the results with thermodynamic databases [1,2].
  • The description and prediction of temperature and stress induced phase transitions and/or structural changes in shape memory alloys, steels and related materials [3].
  • The energetics and kinetics of alloying elements, impurities and defects, and their relevance for embrittlement phenomena, precipitation and ductility of materials [4].

All these aspects are strongly interlinked and - with free energies being at the heart of many materials science problems - are the basis for intensive collaborations with several groups within the MPIE and beyond.

Further reading

 
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