Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design

Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design

The research in the department 'Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design' is basicly focussed on the relationship between synthesis, microstructure and resultant mechanical properties of nanostructured materials. Thereby mainly iron-, magnesium-, titanium-, nickelbased alloys and intermetallics are used. Biological- and metal-based composites as well as investigations on interfaces in solar cells complete the variety of materials. To study the microstructure and the mechanical properties and their interplay advanced characterization methods from single atom level up to the macroscopic scale are used.

Scientific Concept

The department conducts basic research on the relationship between synthesis, processing, microstructure and properties of compositionally and structurally complex materials. Emphasis lies on nanostructured alloys based on iron, magnesium, titanium, nickel, intermetallics and metal-matrix composites which are characterized by a large variety of phase transformations, kinetics and defect substructures. We apply advanced characterization methods from the single atom level up to the macroscopic scale together with multiscale simulation methods, focusing on mechanical structure-property relations. Our preferred experimental tools are local electrode atom probe tomography (APT) correlated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cross-correlation EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) and 3D EBSD methods , electron chaneling contrast imaging (ECCI) under controlled diffraction conditions, and in-situ micromechanical experiments correlated to local strain mapping and micromechanical simulations. Our modeling tools have been rendered into the modular freeware simulation package DAMASK (Düsseldorf Advanced Material Simulation Kit) which is a hierarchically structured model of material point behaviour for the solution of elastoplastic boundary value problems along with damage and thermal effects. Our approaches and main topics are shown in Fig. 1. Some of the most exiting scientific fields currently pursued are shown in Fig. 2.

<div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Fig. 1</strong>: Research approach, interests and corresponding long-term method development in the Department for Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design.</div> Zoom Image
Fig. 1: Research approach, interests and corresponding long-term method development in the Department for Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design.
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<div style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Fig. 2</strong>: Some scientific fields currently pursued in the Department for Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design.</div> Zoom Image
Fig. 2: Some scientific fields currently pursued in the Department for Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design.

Research Groups

The department is organized in scientific groups some of which are extramurally funded and hence non-permanent.

 
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