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Yasmin Ahmed Salem, M.A.
Yasmin Ahmed Salem
Press and Public Relations Officer
Phone: +49 211 6792 722
Room: 222

Scientific Events

Scientific Events

Month:

Symposium “Mechanical Properties and Adhesion 44th ICMCTF (International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings and Thin Films)

17691 1551254169

Symposium “Mechanical Properties and Adhesion 44th ICMCTF (International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings and Thin Films)

Topic day “Lokale Charakterisierungsmethoden in der Werkstoffforschung” at the Metallkundekolloquium/Arlbergkolloquium

17703 1551254195

Topic day “Lokale Charakterisierungsmethoden in der Werkstoffforschung” at the Metallkundekolloquium/Arlbergkolloquium

Hydrogen interaction in metals

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Hydrogen Interaction in Metals

The workshop is part of our series of one-day workshops "Frontiers in Material Science & Engineering", where we bring together leading experts from academia and industry in a workshop format that allows in-depth discussions of fundamental and applied research in this area. Places are limited to 50 participants. The workshop participation is free-of-charge and is sponsored by the MPIE. [more]

Workshop "Frontiers in Material Science & Engineering: Hydrogen Interaction in Metals"

17702 1551254242

Workshop "Frontiers in Material Science & Engineering: Hydrogen Interaction in Metals"

MPIE-Colloquium: Complex nanostructures and nanocomposites for plasmonic and photonic applications

9380 1518609168

MPIE-Colloquium: Complex nanostructures and nanocomposites for plasmonic and photonic applications

Nanoparticles, nanowires, and many other nanostructures are produced and investigated for applications for quite some time. The desired functionality is not easy to achieve in a reproducible way. Various methods will be presented how such structures can be produced in a well defined arrangement and well defined functionality. Nanoporous gold nanosponges will be presented and it will be shown how disorder can be used to obtain a robust and reproducible functionality, i.e. disorder can be used for precision.In addition, nanoporous nanostructures can be easily tuned for applications by advancing them to nanocomposites with desired functionality, which can be used in medicine, energy storage and conversion, photocatalysis and further applications. [more]

9424 1490081173

MULTICOMPONENT AND HIGH-ENTROPY ALLOYS

Conventional strategy for developing metallurgical alloys is to select the main component based on a primary property requirement, and to use alloying additions to confer secondary properties. This strategy has led to the development of many successful alloys based on a single main component with a mix of different alloying additions to provide a balance of required in-service properties. Typical examples include high temperature Ni superalloys, wrought Al alloys and corrosion resistant stainless steels. However, conventional alloy development strategy leads to an enormous amount of knowledge about alloys based on one component, but little or no knowledge about alloys containing several main components in approximately equal proportions. Theories for the occurrence, structure and properties of crystalline phases are similarly restricted to alloys based on one or two main components. Information and understanding is highly developed about alloys close to the corners and edges of a multicomponent phase diagram, with much less known about alloys in the centre of the diagram. This talk describes a range of other multicomponent alloying strategies and gives a number of examples of high-entropy and other multicomponent alloys. [more]

MPIE Colloquium: Computing Mass Transport in Crystals: Theory, Computation, and Applications

9365 1489153586

MPIE Colloquium: Computing Mass Transport in Crystals: Theory, Computation, and Applications

The processing of materials as well as their technologically important properties are controlled by a combination of thermodynamics--which determines equilibrium--and kinetics--how a material evolves. Mass transport in solids, where different chemical species diffuse in a material due to random motion with or without a driving force, is a fundamental kinetic process for a wide variety of materials problems: growth of precipitates in nearly every advanced structural alloy from steels to superalloys, fusing of powders to make advanced ceramics, degradation of materials from irradiation, permanent changes in shape of materials over long times at high temperatures, corrosion of materials in different chemical environments, charge/discharge cycles in batteries, migration of atoms in electric fields, and more. Mass transport is a fundamentally multiscale phenomenon driven by crystalline defects, where many individual defect displacements sum up to produce chemical distributions at larger length and time scales. State-of-the-art first principles methods make the computation of defect energies and transitions routine for crystalline systems, and upscaling from activation barriers to mesoscale mobilities requires the solution of the master equation for diffusivity. For all but the simplest cases of interstitial diffusivity, and particular approximations with vacancy-mediated diffusion on simple lattices, calculating diffusivity directly is a challenge. This leaves two choices: uncontrolled approximations to map the problem onto a simpler (solved) problem, or a stochastic method like kinetic Monte Carlo, which can be difficult to converge for cases of strong correlations. I will describe and demonstrate our new developments for direct and automated Green function solutions for transport that take full advantage of crystal symmetry. This approach has provided new predictions for light element diffusion in magnesium, "pipe diffusion" of hydrogen along dislocations cores in palladium, and the evolution of vacancies and silicon near a dislocation in nickel. I will also show our latest results for technologically relevant magnesium alloys with containing Al, Zn, and rare earth elements (Gd, Y, Nd, Ce and La), where prior theoretical models to predict diffusivity from atomic jump frequencies make uncontrolled approximations that impact their accuracy. The underlying automation also makes the extension of first-principles transport databases significantly more practical and eliminate uncontrolled approximations in the transport model. [more]

 
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